Keith Brown

  • This is the third volume in The History of the Scottish Parliament. In volumes 1 and 2 the contributors addressed discrete episodes in political history from the early thirteenth century through to 1707, demonstrating the richness of the sources for such historical writing and the importance of parliament to that history. In Volume 3 the contributors have built on that foundation and taken advantage of the Records of the Parliaments of Scotland to discuss a comprehensive range of key themes in the development of parliament.
    The editors, Keith M. Brown and Alan R. MacDonald, have assembled a team of established and younger scholars who each discuss a theme that ranges over the entire six centuries of the parliament's existence. These include broad, interpretive chapters on each of the key political constituencies represented in parliament. Thus Roland Tanner and Gillian MacIntosh write on parliament and the crown, Roland Tanner and Kirsty McAlister discuss parliament and the church, Keith Brown addresses parliament and the nobility and Alan MacDonald examines parliament and the burghs. Cross-cutting themes are also analysed. The political culture of parliament is the subject of a chapter by Julian Goodare, while parliament and the law, political ideas and social control are dealt with in turn by Mark Godfrey, James Burns and Alastair Mann. Finally, parliament's own procedures are also discussed by Alastair Mann.
    The History of the Scottish Parliament: Parliament in Context offers the most comprehensive and up-to-date account of the workings and significance of this important institution to the history of late medieval and early modern Scotland.

  • The period between the Reformation and the Covenanting Revolution has generated much historical debate on issues of political authority and power. In this volume Keith M Brown builds on his previous book, Noble Society in Scotland, to argue that in spite of the changes brought about by the Reformation, by the recovery of crown authority and by the regal union between England and Scotland, the huge power exercised by the nobility remained fundamentally unaltered. Hence when political crisis did surface in 1637-8 the crown lacked the means to oppose a noble-led revolution.Noble Power in Scotland is constructed within a framework that discusses the nobility's political relationship with the crown in chapters at either end of this volume, taking the regal union of 1603 as the crucial dividing point. The remainder of the book addresses in turn themes that analyse the various roles nobles inhabited in exercising power. There are chapter on nobles as chiefs of the remarkably strong and durable kindreds or clans, as lords over extensive territorial networks of dependants, as warriors and soldiers in domestic and foreign service, as men whose notions of honour often determined political behaviour, as magistrates presiding over a system of private local jurisdictions while also colonising central law courts, as parliamentarians and royal councillors, and as courtiers in attendance on the king in Scotland and after 1603 in London. Brown places this discussion firmly within a wider debate about the enduring power of European nobilities, showing that the Scottish nobility successfully adapted to political change, just as it did to economic and cultural change, to retain its dominant political position throughout the period.

  • Provides busy social work and health care practitioners with an accessible guide to adult safeguarding in the context of mental capacity and financial abuse. Drawing on evidence and contemporary examples from practice this book will help readers understand the new landscape of safeguarding adults since the implementation of the Care Act 2014 and the introduction of Adult Safeguarding Boards. There are chapters on the current political landscape of adult social work, specific issues and contexts that make people vulnerable (social isolation, mental capacity, dementia), and important methods of assessment and intervention. A range of pedagogical features are also used to aid learning and understanding including the use of case studies, reflection points, brief exercises and further reading.

  • This book explores the main areas of social work law, including children, mental health and community care. By investigating the meaning of law and some of its underlying value assumptions, it encourages practitioners to reflect on their actions and beliefs, helping them to avoid being a mere 'technician', and instead, become a competent practitioner. This new text supports busy social workers studying for Post-Qualifying Awards. Each chapter begins with an overview of the rationale for the teaching material provided and sets out clear learning objectives. Case studies, exercises and recommendations for further reading can be found throughout the book.

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