Livres en VO

  • Anglais Hitler

    Ian Kershaw

    Features "Hitler, Hitler 1889-1936: Hubris" and "Hitler 1936-1945: Nemesis".

  • Daniel Kahneman, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his seminal work in psychology challenging the rational model of judgment and decision making, is one of the world's most important thinkers. His ideas have had a profound impact on many fields-including business, medicine, and politics-but until now, he has never brought together his many years of research in one book. In Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think and make choices. One system is fast, intuitive, and emotional; the other is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. Kahneman exposes the extraordinary capabilities-and also the faults and biases-of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behaviour. The importance of properly framing risks, the effects of cognitive biases on how we view others, the dangers of prediction, the right ways to develop skills, the pros and cons of fear and optimism, the difference between our experience and memory of events, the real components of happiness-each of these can be understood only by knowing how the two systems work together to shape our judgments and decisions. Drawing on a lifetime's experimental experience, Kahneman reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our professional and our personal lives-and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. Thinking, Fast and Slow will transform the way you take decisions and experience the world.

  • Offers an account of the last days of peace in 1939. This title presents the story in the capitals of Europe as politicians and the public braced themselves for a war that they feared might spell the end of European civilisation. It provides a defining moment in the history of the violent twentieth century.

  • Anglais End, the

    Ian Kershaw

    The last months of the Second World War were a nightmarish time to be alive. Unimaginable levels of violence destroyed entire cities. Millions died or were dispossessed. By all kinds of criteria it was the end: the end of the Third Reich and its terrible empire but also, increasingly, it seemed to be the end of European civilization itself. In his gripping, revelatory new book Ian Kershaw describes these final months, from the failed attempt to assassinate Hitler in July 1944 to the German surrender in May 1945. The major question that Kershaw attempts to answer is: what made Germany keep on fighting? In almost every major war there has come a point where defeat has loomed for one side and its rulers have cut a deal with the victors, if only in an attempt to save their own skins. In Hitler's Germany, nothing of this kind happened: in the end the regime had to be stamped out town by town with a level of brutality almost without precedent. Both a highly original piece of research and a gripping narrative, The End makes vivid an era which still deeply scars Europe. It raises the most profound questions about the nature of the Second World War, about the Third Reich and about how ordinary people behave in extreme circumstances.

  • Anglais On china

    Henry Kissinger

    For the first time in a full length book Henry Kissinger writes about the country he has known intimately for decades, and whose modern relations with the West he helped shape. Drawing on historical records as well as his conversations with Chinese leaders over the past forty years, Kissinger examines how China has approached diplomacy, strategy, and negotiation throughout its history, and reflects on the consequences for the 21st-century world.


    The unique conditions under which China developed continue to shape its policies and attitudes toward the outside world. For millennia China rarely encountered other societies of comparable size and sophistication. It was the "Middle Kingdom," treating people on its periphery as vassal states. At the same time, Chinese statesmen - facing threats of invasion from without, and the contests of competing factions within - developed a canon of strategic thought that emphasized long-term structural advantage rather than absolute victory, and that prized the virtues of subtlety, patience, and indirection over feats of martial prowess. With the enduring institutions of Chinese statecraft and civilization clearly in mind Kissinger examines key episodes in China's history from the earliest days through the 20th century. The book provides a sweeping historical perspective on Chinese foreign policy.

  • Shakespeare lived through a pivotal period in human history. What were Londoners thinking when they went to see Shakespeare's plays? What was it like living in their world? In this book, the author looks at twenty objects from Shakespeare's life and times, and uncovers the stories behind them.

  • Drawing on letters, memoirs, conversations, this work tells the story of how Russians tried to endure life under Stalin, conveying the reality of their terrible choices. It recreates the sort of maze in which Russians found themselves, where an unwitting wrong turn could either destroy a family or, perversely, later save it.

  • Our lives are driven by a fact that most of us can't name and don't understand. This title explains why this personality type is so important in society. It shows how the brain chemistry of introverts and extroverts differs, and how society misunderstands and undervalues introverts.

  • For over three thousand years, the Mediterranean Sea has been one of the great centres of world civilisation. From the time of historical Troy until the middle of the nineteenth century, human activity here decisively shaped much of the course of world history. David Abulafia's The Great Sea is the first complete history of the Mediterranean from the erection of the mysterious temples on Malta around 3500 BC to the recent reinvention of the Mediterranean's shores as a tourist destination.


    Part of the argument of Abulafia's book is that the great port cities - Alexandria, Trieste and Salonika and many others - prospered in part because of their ability to allow many different peoples, religions and identities to co-exist within sometimes very confined spaces. He also brilliantly populates his history with identifiable individuals whose lives illustrate with great immediacy the wider developments he is describing.


    The Great Sea ranges stupendously across time and the whole extraordinary space of the Mediterranean from Gibraltar to Jaffa, Venice to Alexandria. Rather than imposing a false unity on the sea and the teeming human activity it has sustained, the book emphasises diversity - ethnic, linguistic, religious and political. Anyone who reads it will leave it with their understanding of those societies and their histories enormously enriched.

  • Anglais THE IDEA OF JUSTICE

    Amartya Sen

    Is justice an ideal, forever beyond our grasp, or something that may actually guide our practical decisions and enhance our lives? This work presents an alternative approach to mainstream theories of justice which, despite their many specific achievements have taken us, he argues, in the wrong direction in general.

  • To mark the centenary of its foundation, the British Security Service, MI5, has opened its archives to an independent historian. This book reveals the precise role of the Service in twentieth-century British history, from its foundation by Captain Kell of the British Army in October 1909 onwards. It also describes the distinctive ethos of MI5.

  • Anglais The cold war

    Gaddis John Lewis

    Beginning with the Second World War, and ending with the collapse of the Soviet Union, this book provides an account of the strategic dynamics that drove that age. As Britain finds itself in a global confrontation with an implacable ideological enemy, this book tells a story whose lessons are necessary to understand.

  • 'A magnificent challenge to conventional ideas' Financial Times 'I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It manages to be both challenging and entertaining: it is highly recommended' the Independent '(Greene) send(s) the reader's imagination hurtling through the universe on an astonishing ride.

  • How do we steer global politics when there are now so many who believe they are entitled to a hand on the steering wheel? In answering such questions, this work examines, digests and judges vast quantities of information from many different fields of study which bear on each of the interconnected areas of politics, economics and ecology.

  • Reveals why India's huge population has now become her greatest strength; how information technology is bringing the benefits of globalization; why rapid urbanization is transforming social and political life; and how we can learn from India's difficult journey towards a single internal market.

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