Langue française

  • White

    Bret Easton Ellis

    Own it, snowflakes: you've lost everything you claim to hold dear. White is Bret Easton Ellis's first work of nonfiction. Already the bad boy of American literature, from Less Than Zero to American Psycho , Ellis has also earned the wrath of right-thinking people everywhere with his provocations on social media, and here he escalates his admonishment of received truths as expressed by today's version of "the left." Eschewing convention, he embraces views that will make many in literary and media communities cringe, as he takes aim at the relentless anti-Trump fixation, coastal elites, corporate censorship, Hollywood, identity politics, Generation Wuss, "woke" cultural watchdogs, the obfuscation of ideals once both cherished and clear, and the fugue state of American democracy. In a young century marked by hysterical correctness and obsessive fervency on both sides of an aisle that's taken on the scale of the Grand Canyon, White is a clarion call for freedom of speech and artistic freedom. "The central tension in Ellis's art--or his life, for that matter--is that while [his] aesthetic is the cool reserve of his native California, detachment over ideology, he can't stop generating heat.... He's hard-wired to break furniture."--Karen Heller, The Washington Post "Sweating with rage . . . humming with paranoia."--Anna Leszkiewicz, The Guardian "Snowflakes on both coasts in withdrawal from Rachel Maddow's nightly Kremlinology lesson can purchase a whole book to inspire paroxysms of rage . . . a veritable thirst trap for the easily microaggressed. It's all here. Rants about Trump derangement syndrome; MSNBC; #MeToo; safe spaces."--Bari Weiss , The New York Times

  • M train

    Patti Smith

    National Bestseller Featuring a new postscript including five new photos from Patti Smith From the National Book Awardwinning author of Just Kids : an unforgettable odyssey of a legendary artist, told through the cafés and haunts she has worked in around the world. It is a book Patti Smith has described as a roadmap to my life. M Train begins in the tiny Greenwich Village café where Smith goes every morning for black coffee, ruminates on the world as it is and the world as it was, and writes in her notebook. Through prose that shifts fluidly between dreams and reality, past and present, we travel to Frida Kahlos Casa Azul in Mexico; to the fertile moon terrain of Iceland; to a ramshackle seaside bungalow in New Yorks Far Rockaway that Smith acquires just before Hurricane Sandy hits; to the West 4th Street subway station, filled with the sounds of the Velvet Underground after the death of Lou Reed; and to the graves of Genet, Plath, Rimbaud, and Mishima. Woven throughout are reflections on the writers craft and on artistic creation. Here, too, are singular memories of Smiths life in Michigan and the irremediable loss of her husband, Fred Sonic Smith. Braiding despair with hope and consolation, illustrated with her signature Polaroids, M Train is a meditation on travel, detective shows, literature, and coffee. It is a powerful, deeply moving book by one of the most remarkable multiplatform artists at work today.

  • THE TESTAMENTS

    Margaret Atwood

    #1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE BOOKER PRIZE The Testaments is a modern masterpiece, a powerful novel that can be read on its own or as a companion to Margaret Atwoods classic, The Handmaids Tale . More than fifteen years after the events of The Handmaid's Tale, the theocratic regime of the Republic of Gilead maintains its grip on power, but there are signs it is beginning to rot from within. At this crucial moment, the lives of three radically different women converge, with potentially explosive results. Two have grown up as part of the first generation to come of age in the new order. The testimonies of these two young women are joined by a third: Aunt Lydia. Her complex past and uncertain future unfold in surprising and pivotal ways. With The Testaments, Margaret Atwood opens up the innermost workings of Gilead, as each woman is forced to come to terms with who she is, and how far she will go for what she believes.

  • THE GLASS HOTEL

    Emily St. John Mandel

    B>b>ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR/b>br>b>b>NPR b> /b>TIME THE WASHINGTON POST b>/b> /b>ELLE THE BBC b>/b> THRILLIST b> BOOKPAGE b>/b> THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY/b>/b>br>br>From the award-winning author of Station Eleven, an exhilarating novel set at the glittering intersection of two seemingly disparate events--a massive Ponzi scheme collapse and the mysterious disappearance of a woman from a ship at sea./b>br>br>Vincent is a bartender at the Hotel Caiette, a five-star lodging on the northernmost tip of Vancouver Island. On the night she meets Jonathan Alkaitis, a hooded figure scrawls a message on the lobby''s glass wall: Why dont you swallow broken glass. High above Manhattan, a greater crime is committed: Alkaitis is running an international Ponzi scheme, moving imaginary sums of money through clients accounts. When the financial empire collapses, it obliterates countless fortunes and devastates lives. Vincent, who had been posing as Jonathans wife, walks away into the night. Years later, a victim of the fraud is hired to investigate a strange occurrence: a woman has seemingly vanished from the deck of a container ship between ports of call.br> br>In this captivating story of crisis and survival, Emily St. John Mandel takes readers through often hidden landscapes: campgrounds for the near-homeless, underground electronica clubs, the business of international shipping, service in luxury hotels, and life in a federal prison. Rife with unexpected beauty, The Glass Hotel is a captivating portrait of greed and guilt, love and delusion, ghosts and unintended consequences, and the infinite ways we search for meaning in our lives.

  • B>INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BEST SELLERbr>LONGLISTED FOR THE BOOKER PRIZEbr>/b>br>b>Tyler''s novels are always worth scooping up--but especially this gently amusing soother, right now. --NPR/b>br>br>From the beloved Anne Tyler, a sparkling new novel about misperception, second chances, and the sometimes elusive power of human connection.b>br>/b>br>Micah Mortimer is a creature of habit. A self-employed tech expert, superintendent of his Baltimore apartment building, cautious to a fault behind the steering wheel, he seems content leading a steady, circumscribed life. br>br>But one day his routines are blown apart when his woman friend (he refuses to call anyone in her late thirties a "girlfriend") tells him she''s facing eviction, and a teenager shows up at Micah''s door claiming to be his son. These surprises, and the ways they throw Micah''s meticulously organized life off-kilter, risk changing him forever. br>br>An intimate look into the heart and mind of a man who finds those around him just out of reach, and a funny, joyful, deeply compassionate story about seeing the world through new eyes, Redhead by the Side of the Road is a triumph, filled with Anne Tyler''s signature wit and gimlet-eyed observation.

  • In this honest and stunning novel, now a major motion picture directed by Barry Jenkins, James Baldwin has given America a moving story of love in the face of injustice. Told through the eyes of Tish, a nineteen-year-old girl, in love with Fonny, a young sculptor who is the father of her child, Baldwins story mixes the sweet and the sad. Tish and Fonny have pledged to get married, but Fonny is falsely accused of a terrible crime and imprisoned. Their families set out to clear his name, and as they face an uncertain future, the young lovers experience a kaleidoscope of emotionsaffection, despair, and hope. In a love story that evokes the blues, where passion and sadness are inevitably intertwined, Baldwin has created two characters so alive and profoundly realized that they are unforgettably ingrained in the American psyche.

  • A New York Times Editors Choice Book Spanning almost thirty years and settings that range from big cities to small towns and farmsteads of rural Canada, this magnificent collection brings together twenty-eight stories by a writer of unparalleled wit, generosity, and emotional power. In A Wilderness Station: Selected Stories, 19681994 , Alice Munro makes lives that seem small unfold until they are revealed to be as spacious as prairies and locates the moments of love and betrayal, desire and forgiveness, that change those lives forever. A traveling salesman during the Depression takes his children with him on an impromptu visit to a former girlfriend. A poor girl steels herself to marry a rich fiancé she cant quite manage to love. An abandoned woman tries to choose between the opposing pleasures of seduction and solitude. To read these stories is to succumb to the spell of a true narrative sorcerer, a writer who enchants her readers utterly even as she restores them to their truest selves.

  • SONG OF SOLOMON

    Toni Morrison

    New York Times Bestseller Milkman Dead was born shortly after a neighborhood eccentric hurled himself off a rooftop in a vain attempt at flight. For the rest of his life he, too, will be trying to fly. With this brilliantly imagined novel, Toni Morrison transfigures the coming-of-age story as audaciously as Saul Bellow or Gabriel García Márquez. As she follows Milkman from his rustbelt city to the place of his familys origins, Morrison introduces an entire cast of strivers and seeresses, liars and assassins, the inhabitants of a fully realized black world. "You can't go wrong by reading or re-reading the collected works of Toni Morrison. Beloved , Song of Solomo n, The Bluest Eye , Sula , everything else -- they're transcendent, all of them. Youll be glad you read them."--Barack Obama

  • The Sound and the Fury is the tragedy of the Compson family, featuring some of the most memorable characters in literature: beautiful, rebellious Caddy; the manchild Benjy; haunted, neurotic Quentin; Jason, the brutal cynic; and Dilsey, their black servant. Their lives fragmented and harrowed by history and legacy, the characters voices and actions mesh to create what is arguably Faulkners masterpiece and one of the greatest novels of the twentieth century. I give you the mausoleum of all hope and desire. . . . I give it to you not that you may remember time, but that you might forget it now and then for a moment and not spend all of your breath trying to conquer it. Because no battle is ever won he said. They are not even fought. The field only reveals to man his own folly and despair, and victory is an illusion of philosophers and fools. --from The Sound and the Fury

  • HOMEGOING

    Yaa Gyasi

    @00000327@@00000327@Winner of the PEN/ Hemingway Award@00000133@@00000341@Winner of the NBCC's John Leonard Award@00000341@Shortlisted for the British Book Award - Debut of the Year@00000341@A @00000373@New York Times @00000155@Notable Book@00000341@A @00000373@Washington Post @00000155@Notable Book@00000341@@00000373@One of the Best Books of the Year: NPR, @00000373@Time@00000155@, Oprah.com, @00000373@Harper@00000065@s Bazaar@00000155@, @00000373@San Francisco Chronicle@00000155@, @00000373@Mother Jones@00000155@, @00000373@Esquire@00000155@, @00000373@Elle@00000155@, @00000373@Paste, Entertainment Weekly@00000155@, @00000373@the Skimm, PopSugar, Minneapolis Star Tribune@00000155@, @00000373@BuzzFeed, The Guardian, Financial Times@00000155@@00000341@ @00000155@@00000133@@00000341@Ghana, eighteenth century: two half sisters are born into different villages, each unaware of the other. One will marry an Englishman and lead a life of comfort in the palatial rooms of the Cape Coast Castle. The other will be captured in a raid on her village, imprisoned in the very same castle, and sold into slavery. @00000341@ @00000341@ @00000373@Homegoing @00000155@follows the parallel paths of these sisters and their descendants through eight generations: from the Gold Coast to the plantations of Mississippi, from the American Civil War to Jazz Age Harlem. Yaa Gyasi@00000065@s extraordinary novel illuminates slavery@00000065@s troubled legacy both for those who were taken and those who stayed--and shows how the memory of captivity has been inscribed on the soul of our nation.

  • " Mountain ," Baldwin said, "is the book I had to write if I was ever going to write anything else." Go Tell It On The Mountain , first published in 1953, is Baldwin's first major work, a novel that has established itself as an American classic. With lyrical precision, psychological directness, resonating symbolic power, and a rage that is at once unrelenting and compassionate, Baldwin chronicles a fourteen-year-old boy's discovery of the terms of his identity as the stepson of the minister of a storefront Pentecostal church in Harlem one Saturday in March of 1935. Baldwin's rendering of his protagonist's spiritual, sexual, and moral struggle of self-invention opened new possibilities in the American language and in the way Americans understand themselves.

  • National Bestseller Longlisted for the Man Booker Prize One of the Best Books of the Year: The Washington Post * The Boston Globe * Minneapolis Star Tribune * NPR * Newsday * The Guardian * Financial Times * The Christian Science Monitor The Ministry of Utmost Happiness takes us on an intimate journey across the Indian subcontinent--from the cramped neighborhoods of Old Delhi and the roads of the new city to the mountains and valleys of Kashmir and beyond, where war is peace and peace is war. Braiding together the lives of a diverse cast of characters who have been broken by the world they live in and then rescued, patched together by acts of love--and by hope, here Arundhati Roy reinvents what a novel can do and can be.

  • THE MISTER

    E. L. James

    The #1 New York Times bestseller--a thrilling new romance from E L James, author of the phenomenal bestselling Fifty Shades Trilogy. London, 2019. Life has been easy for Maxim Trevelyan. With his good looks, aristocratic connections, and money, hes never had to work and hes rarely slept alone. But all that changes when tragedy strikes and Maxim inherits his familys noble title, wealth, and estates, and all the responsibility that entails. Its a role hes not prepared for and one that he struggles to face. But his biggest challenge is fighting his desire for an unexpected, enigmatic young woman whos recently arrived in England, possessing little more than a dangerous and troublesome past. Reticent, beautiful, and musically gifted, shes an alluring mystery, and Maxims longing for her deepens into a passion that hes never experienced and dares not name. Just who is Alessia Demachi? Can Maxim protect her from the malevolence that threatens her? And what will she do when she learns that hes been hiding secrets of his own? From the heart of London through wild, rural Cornwall to the bleak, forbidding beauty of the Balkans, The Mister is a roller-coaster ride of danger and desire that leaves the reader breathless to the very last page.

  • An autobiographical portrait of marriage and motherhood by the acclaimed author details her struggle to come to terms with life and death, illness, sanity, personal upheaval, and grief.

  • NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER A brilliant book, wise and nuanced. -- Nicholas Kristof, New York Times Comprehensive, enlightening, and terrifyingly timely. -- New York Times Book Review Cool and persuasive... How Democracies Die comes at exactly the right moment. -- The Washington Post Donald Trumps presidency has raised a question that many of us never thought wed be asking: Is our democracy in danger? Harvard professors Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt have spent more than twenty years studying the breakdown of democracies in Europe and Latin America, and they believe the answer is yes. Democracy no longer ends with a bang--in a revolution or military coup--but with a whimper: the slow, steady weakening of critical institutions, such as the judiciary and the press, and the gradual erosion of long-standing political norms. The good news is that there are several exit ramps on the road to authoritarianism. The bad news is that, by electing Trump, we have already passed the first one. Drawing on decades of research and a wide range of historical and global examples, from 1930s Europe to contemporary Hungary, Turkey, and Venezuela, to the American South during Jim Crow, Levitsky and Ziblatt show how democracies die--and how ours can be saved.

  • Weather

    Jenny Offill

    B>INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES BEST SELLER br>br> From the beloved author of the nationwide best seller Dept. of Speculationb>--/b>one of the New York Times Book Review''s Ten Best Books of the Yearb>--/b>a darkly funny and urgent (NPR) tour de force about a family, and a nation, in crisis/b>br>br> Lizzie Benson slid into her job as a librarian without a traditional degree. But this gives her a vantage point from which to practice her other calling: she is a fake shrink. For years she has tended to her God-haunted mother and her recovering addict brother. They have both stabilized for the moment, but Lizzie has little chance to spend her new free time with husband and son before her old mentor, Sylvia Liller, makes a proposal. Sylvia has become famous for her prescient podcast, Hell and High Water, and wants to hire Lizzie to answer the mail she receives: from left-wingers worried about climate change and right-wingers worried about the decline of western civilization.br>br> As Lizzie dives into this polarized world, she begins to wonder what it means to keep tending your own garden once you''ve seen the flames beyond its walls. When her brother becomes a father and Sylvia a recluse, Lizzie is forced to address the limits of her own experience--but still she tries to save everyone, using everything she''s learned about empathy and despair, conscience and collusion, from her years of wandering the library stacks . . . And all the while the voices of the city keep floating in--funny, disturbing, and increasingly mad. br>br> b>Offills fragmentary structure evokes an unbearable emotional intensity: something at the core of the story that cannot be narrated directly, by straight chronology, because to do so would be like looking at the sun --The New York Times/b>

  • GOD HELP THE CHILD

    Toni Morrison

    Spare and unsparing, God Help the Child --the first novel by Toni Morrison to be set in our current moment--weaves a tale about the way the sufferings of childhood can shape, and misshape, the life of the adult. At the center: a young woman who calls herself Bride, whose stunning blue-black skin is only one element of her beauty, her boldness and confidence, her success in life, but which caused her light-skinned mother to deny her even the simplest forms of love. There is Booker, the man Bride loves, and loses to anger. Rain, the mysterious white child with whom she crosses paths. And finally, Brides mother herself, Sweetness, who takes a lifetime to come to understand that what you do to children matters. And they might never forget. A fierce and provocative novel that adds a new dimension to the matchless oeuvre of Toni Morrison.

  • @00000327@#1 @00000373@NEW YORK TIMES @00000155@BESTSELLER @00000133@@00000041@bull; @00000327@Family secrets come back to haunt Jack Reacher in this electrifying thriller from @00000041@ldquo;a superb craftsman of suspense@00000041@rdquo; (@00000373@Entertainment Weekly@00000155@).@00000133@@00000341@@00000341@ Jack Reacher hits the pavement and sticks out his thumb. He plans to follow the sun on an epic trip across America, from Maine to California. He doesn@00000065@t get far. On a country road deep in the New England woods, he sees a sign to a place he has never been: the town where his father was born. He thinks, @00000373@What@00000065@s one extra day?@00000155@ He takes the detour.@00000341@@00000341@ At the same moment, in the same isolated area, a car breaks down. Two young Canadians had been on their way to New York City to sell a treasure. Now they@00000065@re stranded at a lonely motel in the middle of nowhere. The owners seem almost too friendly. It@00000065@s a strange place, but it@00000065@s all there is.@00000341@@00000341@ The next morning, in the city clerk@00000065@s office, Reacher asks about the old family home. He@00000065@s told no one named Reacher ever lived in town. He@00000065@s always known his father left and never returned, but now Reacher wonders, @00000373@Was he ever there in the first place?@00000341@@00000155@@00000341@ @00000373@ @00000155@As Reacher explores his father@00000065@s life, and as the Canadians face lethal dangers, strands of different stories begin to merge. Then Reacher makes a shocking discovery: The present can be tough, but the past can be tense . . . and deadly.@00000341@@00000341@ @00000327@Don@00000065@t miss a sneak peek of Lee Child@00000065@s novel @00000373@Blue Moon@00000155@ in the back of the book.@00000133@@00000341@@00000341@@00000327@Praise for @00000373@Past Tense@00000341@@00000155@@00000133@@00000341@ @00000041@ldquo;Child is one writer who should never be taken for granted.@00000041@rdquo;@00000327@--@00000373@The New York Times Book Review@00000155@@00000133@@00000341@@00000341@ @00000041@ldquo;[Lee Child]@00000373@ @00000155@shows no signs of slowing down. . . . Reacher is a man for whom the phrase @00000373@moral compass @00000155@was invented: His code determines his direction. . . . You need Jack Reacher.@00000041@rdquo;@00000327@--@00000373@The Atlantic@00000155@@00000133@@00000341@@00000341@ @00000041@ldquo;Superb . . . Child neatly interweaves multiple narratives, ratchets up the suspense (the reveal of the motel plot is delicious), and delivers a powerful, satisfying denouement. Fans will enjoy learning more of this enduring character@00000065@s roots, and Child@00000065@s spare prose continues to set a very high bar.@00000041@rdquo;@00000327@--@00000373@Publishers Weekly@00000155@ (boxed and starred review)@00000133@@00000341@@00000341@ @00000041@ldquo;Another first-class entry in a series that continues to set the gold standard for aspiring thriller authors.@00000041@rdquo;@00000327@--@00000373@Booklist @00000155@(starred review)@00000133@@00000341@@00000341@ @00000041@ldquo;With his usual flair for succinctness and eye for detail, Child creates another rollicking Reacher road trip that will please fans and newcomers alike.@00000041@rdquo;@00000327@--@00000373@Library Journal@00000155@ (starred review)@00000133@

  • THE NIX

    Nathan Hill

    A New York Times 2016 Notable Book Entertainment Weekly's #1 Book of the Year A Washington Post 2016 Notable Book A Slate Top Ten Book Nathan Hill is a maestro. --John Irving Its 2011, and Samuel Andresen-Anderson hasnt seen his mother, Faye, in decades--not since she abandoned the family when he was a boy. Now shes reappeared, having committed an absurd crime that electrifies the nightly news and inflames a politically divided country. The media paints Faye as a radical hippie with a sordid past, but as far as Samuel knows, his mother was an ordinary girl who married her high-school sweetheart. Which version of his mother is true? Two facts are certain: shes facing some serious charges, and she needs Samuels help. To save her, Samuel will have to embark on his own journey, uncovering long-buried secrets about the woman he thought he knew, secrets that stretch across generations and have their origin all the way back in Norway, home of the mysterious Nix. As he does so, Samuel will confront not only Fayes losses but also his own lost love, and will relearn everything he thought he knew about his mother, and himself.

  • From "one of the great American writers of our time" (Los Angeles Times Book Review)--a brilliant historical crime novel, a pulse-pounding, as-it-happens narrative that unfolds in Los Angeles and Mexico in the wake in Pearl Harbor. New Year's Eve 1941, war has been declared and the Japanese internment is in full swing. Los Angeles is gripped by war fever and racial hatred. Sergeant Dudley Smith of the Los Angeles Police Department is now Army Captain Smith and a budding war profiteer. He's shacked up with Claire De Haven in Baja, Mexico, and spends his time sniffing out fifth column elements and hunting down a missing Japanese Naval Attaché. Hideo Ashida is cashing LAPD paychecks and working in the crime lab, but he knows he can't avoid internment forever. Newly arrived Navy Lieutenant Joan Conville winds up in jail accused of vehicular homicide, but Captain William H. Parker squashes the charges and puts her on Ashida's team. Elmer Jackson, who is assigned to the alien squad and to bodyguard Ashida, begins to develop an obsession with Kay Lake, the unconsummated object of Captain Parker's desire. Now, Conville and Ashida become obsessed with finding the identity of a body discovered in a mudslide. It's a murder victim linked to an unsolved gold heist from '31, and they want the gold. And things really heat up when two detectives are found murdered in a notorious dope fiend hang-out.

  • Across seven tales, Haruki Murakami brings his powers of observation to bear on the lives of men who, in their own ways, find themselves alone. Here are lovesick doctors, students, ex-boyfriends, actors, bartenders, and even Kafkas Gregor Samsa, brought together to tell stories that speak to us all. In Men Without Women Murakami has crafted another contemporary classic, marked by the same wry humor and pathos that have defined his entire body of work.

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